WEST MALVERN GARDEN AND NATURE CLUB

The West Malvern Garden and Nature Club was founded 27 years ago by three West Malvern ladies. We are still a thriving club with supportive and friendly membership. Meetings are held at the village hall on the third Tuesday of the month, usually at 7.30pm. A variety of speakers are chosen to reflect both the gardening and the nature interests of our club members. Meetings in the hall are held from September until May. During the summer there are organised trips, a Treasure Hunt and an Annual Show. Membership is £5 and £2 a meeting but visitors are always welcome £3 a visit, this includes refreshments after the talk. Membership also includes the chance to win trophies at the Annual Show; the chance to help at the Malvern Spring Show crèche and receive free entry; two ’Over the Fence’ newsletters; an Annual Dinner and a Christmas Party.


ITS THAT TIME OF THE YEAR AGAIN!  THE ANNUAL SHOW SCHEDULE FOR 2018 IS HERE FOR YOU! 

West Malvern Garden

and Nature Club

ANNUAL SHOW 2018

Saturday 1stSeptember

in the Village Hall

The competition is open to members and non-members.  The entry fee is 30pper class, children free; each exhibitor is allowed only one entry per class. There is no entry form.

Children (under 14) may enter any of the classes. Exhibits must be produced by the child and will be judged separately from the adults.
Special for this year:“Mustard & Cress in a Beastly Container”

The following trophies are competed for by members only:

The Anniversary Trophy                       The Basket of Vegetables

The John Deem Cup                               The best overall vegetable grower

The John Deem Prize                  The best Fruit entry

The Members Plate                      The best Craft entry

The Members Shield                    The best Home-Grown entry

The Members Tankard                The best photograph

The Members’ Spoon                  The best Home Cookery entry

 

Timetable

11.00am to 1.00pm     Bring your exhibits to the Village Hall.

1.30pm   to 2.30pm     The Hall will be closed for judging to take place.

2.30pm                        The Hall will open to the public.

3.15pm                        Presentation of prizes.

4.00pm                       Exhibits may be removed from the display.

HOME-GROWN SECTION

Important Note: All exhibits in these classes must have been grown by the exhibitor or in his/her possession for at least two months.

Ornamental

G1.  Best Flower in Your Garden.   A single, flower of any sort, from the exhibitor’s garden.

G2.  Dahlias.   Three compact blooms of any kind (not necessarily of the same cultivar).

G3.  Pansies/Violas.  A posy of Pansies or Violas presented in a posy vase..

G4.  Flowering Pot Plant.  A healthy, unblemished indoor or outdoor plant in a clean pot with maximum top diameter of 9 inches.

G5.  Single Rose.   One rose, just opened, with regular, unblemished petals; fragrance is important.

G6.  Sweet Peas.  Five similar-sized blooms of any colour with straight stems, if possible.

G7.  Vase of Flowers.  Fine blooms of five different species; no limit to numbers of each; foliage permitted.

Fruit

F1.   Berries.   Eight ripe fruits of one cultivar, with stalks attached, neatly displayed.

F2.   Stone Fruit.  Five firm, ripe, undamaged fruits of one cultivar (e.g. damsons), neatly displayed.

F3.   Tomatoes.   Five similar fruits of the same variety, unblemished with calyces attached.

F4.   Any Other Fruit.  Any fruit not listed above with unblemished skins and attractively arranged.

F5.   Basket of Fruit.   A selection of different fruits displayed nicely in a basket.Tomatoes are a fruit.

Vegetables

V1.  Onions.  Three similar sized onions, of uniform size and colour.  Tops bound and displayed on rings.

V2.  Runner Beans.  Five beans of similar length, not over-ripe, as straight as possible.

V1.  Courgettes. Three courgettes of similar size and appearance, as little blemished as possible.

V2.  Potatoes. Three tubers of the same variety, medium sized with few/shallow eyes.

V3.  Carrots.  Three carrots of one variety, roots of uniform size, good colour and shape with skins clean and bright.  The tap root must be left intact.  Leaves should be cut-off to approximately 3 inches (8 cm) of leaf stalk.

V4.  Rhubarb.  The longest stick of rhubarb, with leaf cut-off.

V5.  Herb Collection.  Six culinary herbs presented in individually named bunches, with their stems in water to keep them fresh.  Do not include flowers.

V6.  Any Other Vegetable. Any not listed above, in clean condition.

V7.  Basket of Vegetables (for Trophy).   Six kinds of vegetables displayed nicely in a basket.  No tomatoes.

V8.  Plate of Salad.A plate of home-grown salad items attractively arranged on a plate no larger than 9” in diameter.

COOKERY SECTION  

All entries in this section must have been made by the exhibitor.

M1.                             Lemon Polenta Cake.Made according to the recipe on page 4.

M2.Garden Club Challenge.   Vegetable Themed Quiche in an 8” diameter tin. Recipe to be included. Judging will be based on taste and appearance.

M3.Date and Walnut Scones.  Four similar sized scones, made to your own recipe, presented on a plate.

M4.Biscuits.   Four biscuits, or cookies, nicely presented and accompanied by a list of ingredients.Flavour, textureand presentation are important.

M5.Marmalade.   Lemon and Lime. Follow your own recipe; set, flavour and presentation are important.

M6.Jam – Summer Fruit.   Follow your own recipe; set, flavour and presentation are important. There shall be a minimum of three different fruits and all fruits used are to be named.

CRAFT SECTION

(Flowers/foliage need not have been grown by the exhibitor.)

D1.   Table Centre.  Made from plant material (anyflowers, leaves or berries etc.) and not more than 8 inches high/wide; may be in oasis or a vase etc.

D1.      AutumnArrangement.  Anyautumn material in an arrangement not more thaneighteen inches high; maybe inoasis or a vase etc.

D2.       Art.  A painting or drawing in any medium, or combined media, suitably presented.

D3.       Embroidery or Sewing.  Any item made by the exhibitor.

D4.       Knitting or Crochet Work.  Any item made by the exhibitor.

D5.       Other Craft.  Any other article constructed by the exhibitor, with or without tools. With explanation of techniques used.

PHOTOGRAPHIC SECTION

Important Note: All photographs must have been taken by the exhibitor and not presented previously. They should be mounted or stuck on paper. Maximum size is 5" x 7", not including the mounts.

P1.  Tree(s) with Character.     A tree that stands out from the rest.

P2.  Single Spring Flower.       To show the promise of a new spring.

P3.  Action with a Caption.        An action photo with amusing caption.

P4.  Spider’s Web.                      May be with or without a spider.

Recipe –Lemon Polenta Cake

200g soft unsalted butter (7oz.)                  200g caster sugar (7oz.)

3 large eggs                                                 200g ground almond (7oz.)
100g fine polenta (or cornmeal) (3.5oz.)     1½ teaspoons baking powder

zest of 2 lemons (save juice for syrup)      

For the syrup:          juice of 2 lemons         125g icing sugar (4.5oz.)

Pre-heat the oven to gas mark 4 (350°F) (180°C)

Method

Line the base of a 23cm / 9” spring form cake tin with baking parchment and lightly grease the sides with butter. Beat the butter and sugar till pale and whipped. Mix together the almonds, polenta and baking powder, and beat some of this into the butter-sugar mixture, followed by 1 egg, then alternate dry ingredients and eggs, beating all the while. Beat in the lemon zest and spoon the mixture into your prepared tin and bake for about 40 minutes. It may seem wobbly but the cake is cooked if the edges of the cake have begun to shrink away from the sides of the tin. Leave to cool in its tin. Make the syrup by boiling together the lemon juice and icing sugar. Prick the top of the cake all over with a cake tester (a skewer is too destructive), pour the warm syrup over the cake, and leave to cool before taking it out of its tin.



HAVE FUN AND GOOD LUCK!!





2017-2018 New Season 

2017 

September 2     (Saturday)           Annual Show

September 7 (Thursday)               The World’s Biggest Coffee Morning  

September 19                     Roger Smith                        Mountain Flowers of the Worl

October 17                           Reg Moule                            An Evening with Reg

November 21                       Michael Colquhoun        Birds of the Malvern

December 12                       Christmas Party

2018

January 16                             Keith Ferguson                     Growing & Showing Vegetables

February 20                         Duncan Coombs                      The Herbaceous Border

March 20                               AGM   7pm start                   speaker to be announced

April 17                                  Gary Farmer                              India - On the Trail of the Tiger

May 15                                     Philip Seaton                            Orchids - Biodiversity & Conservation

Further information nearer the time will be published about the meetings.

Please come and join us we are always happy to welcome visitors and new members.





WEST MALVERN GARDEN AND NATURE CLUB - 16th May 2017
Gillian Hale's visit, accompanied by 9 owls was the best attended meeting of the season! A large number of children came and sat quietly through Gillian's talk and waited, with keen expectations, for the owls.  For over an hour after her talk people were still taking photographs and stroking the owls.  It is amazing that the owls were so patient.  Gillian trains them from very young to accept various noises by taking them with her in a basket when she goes shopping! She didn't bring the eagle owl, which is the largest of the owls.  Its grip, with each foot is the equivalent of an Alsatian dog's jaw! They are used to hunt wolves in the Black Forest in Germany and are known to kill Roe Deer in Scotland.  Probably a little two fearsome for a Tuesday night in West Malvern although I think the children would have been keen to see it! These owls that Gillian rescues and cares for are unable to fend for themselves in the wild; and some are injured and need to be cared for to recover.  It really was an interesting evening, many people saying that they had never seen a live owl up close.  It really is a good way of educating old as well as young, to have this opportunity to get up close to them.  I am sure that any future visit from Gillian will be as well attended as this.
This meeting was the last until 19th September when the new club year begins.  In the meantime there are club trips and 2nd September is the ANNUAL SHOW open to everyone.  Come and join us for the show, look out for our 2017/2018 programme and join us for another interesting year.

Carole Houghton

WEST MALVERN GARDEN AND NATURE CLUB - SHOW RESULTS

On Saturday the Club held its Annual Show. After last year’s unfortunate cancellation we were pleased to have so much support from members and non-members. There was a wide range of entries across vegetables, fruit, flowers, cookery, art and photography; all well supported. The weather had produced some wonderful flowers, cultivated and shown to perfection by the gardeners. An abundance of fruit and vegetables was evident on the produce stall along with preserves, cakes and art work; all sales helping the club’s funds.

A big thank you to the people, who organised the show, set it up on the Saturday and worked hard behind the scenes to make it an enjoyable day for those who took part or just came to view the exhibits and sample the refreshments. (More details at westmalvernvillagehall.org)

Prizes were presented by Club President David Matthews .

Here are the results

Winners of the Club Trophies

The Anniversary Trophy – Basket of Vegetables – Lynn Clearwaters

The John Deem Cup- Best Overall Vegetable Grower-Chantal Crawford

The John Deem Prize-Best Fruit Entry-Chantal Crawford

The Members Plate-The Best Craft Entry-Kathy Frampton

The Members Shield-The Best Home-Grown Entry-Lynn Clearwaters

The Members Tankard-The Best Photograph-Sue Kershaw

The Members Spoon-The Best Home Cookery Entry-Chantal Crawford

The Children’s Prize-William Edwards (a star baker in the making)

Results

CLASS

1st

2nd

Highly Commended

Best Flower

Chantal Crawford

Kathy Frampton

Colin Jackson

Dahlias

Deidre Drake

Jane Edwards

Phil Drake

Pansies/Violas

Caroline Bellhouse

 

 

Single Rose

Hilary Ward

 

Deidre Drake

Sweet Peas

Claire Roslington

Cara Roslington

 

Vase of Flowers

Chantal Crawford

Caroline Bellhouse

Hilary Ward

Berries

Lynn Clearwaters

Natalie Jones

Kathy Frampton

Stone Fruit

Helen Tudge

Deirdre Drake

 

Tomatoes

Kathy Frampton

Chantal Crawford

Colin Jackson

Any other Fruit

Vic Frampton

Cara Rosslington

David Matthews

Basket of Fruit

Chantal Crawford

Deidre Drake

 

Onions

Vic Frampton

Colin Jackson

Chantal Crawford

Runner Beans

Chantal Crawford

Margaret Rowland

Kathy Frampton

Courgettes

Cara Roslington

Claire Roslington

 

Potatoes

Colin Jackson

Lynn Clearwaters

 

Carrots

Vic Frampton

Lynn Clearwaters

Natalie Jones

Rhubarb

Lynn Clearwaters

Chantal Crawford

Margaret Rowlands

Herb Collection

Chantal Crawford

Cara Roslington

Kathleen Beach

Any Other Veg

Hilary Ward

Chantal Crawford

Vic Frampton

Basket of Veg

Lynn Clearwaters

Chantal Crawford

Cara Roslington

Swiss Roll

Kathy Frampton

Carole Houghton

 

Rosemary’s Challenge

Chantal Crawford

Steve Birch

Carole Houghton

Sultana Scones

Steve Birch

Jane Edwards

N/A

Lemon Curd

Chantal Crawford

Kathy Frampton

N/A

3 Fruit Marmalade

Kathleen Beach

Carole Houghton

Richard Beach

Plum Jam

Kathleen Beach

Carole Houghton

Colin Jackson

Table Decoration

Chantal Crawford

Caroline Bellhouse

 

Foliage Arrangement

Sue Kershaw

Hilary Ward

N/A

Embroidery/Sewing

Carole Houghton

 

 

Knitting/Crochet

Kathy Frampton

 

 

Other Craft

Kathleen Beach

Margaret Price

Sara Bennett

Art

Sara Bennett

 

 

Photo Leaves

Vic Frampton

Sue Kershaw

Hilary Ward

Photo Celebrations

Sue Kershaw

Caroline Bellhouse

Colin Jackson

Photo Black&White

Eric Hollands

Vic Frampton

Kathy Frampton

Photo Waterfalls

Caroline Bellhouse

Chantal Crawford

Vic Frampton

 



NOTES FROM OUR OCTOBER MEETING!

The October meeting was ‘An Evening with Reg Moule’. A select gathering enjoyed a varied an interesting question and answer session with him after he gave us a short talk about insectivorous plants, ferns and making leaf mould.

This is good time to make leaf mould especially if you have a lot of leaves blown off your trees by Storm Brian! Use green garden sacks or black sacks and fill with leaves. If they are dry dampen them then tie up the top of the bag and make two holes in the bag and store it behind your shed, greenhouse or wherever is convenient. It takes at least two years for the leaves to break down. If you can use leaves of different species together this helps as they rot at different times. Reg said trees like walnut and horse chestnut need two years to rot as leaves produce a natural herbicide for their own protection and the longer they rot it will reduce the herbicide strength.dampen the leavespng

Leaf mould was used before peat in compost and it is good to mix it with peat or other composts. Leaves can be composted in heaps but need to be in a contained space, four posts with plastic mesh as walls to stop the leaves blowing away, and covered with anti-bird mesh over the top to keep the leaves in and to allow rain to get in.

Reg said that trees go to the toilet once a year. Trees put all their waste products into the leaves when they are shed. He also said trees have meaningful sex every three years – hence the abundance of acorns this year!

These were some of the questions.

1. Why is my tomato like this? A tomato with a brown top was shown.

Reg said it looked like the tomatoes had got cold. It wasn’t potato blight. We did have a lot of variations in temperature this summer and these tomatoes had reacted to being cold.

2. Can you store shallots like onions?

Reg explained the method of stringing up onions and thought that shallots could be stored in the same way but it is more difficult because the stems and necks, which are used to secure onions, were thinner and more fragile on shallots. He said storing in trays or nets so that air could circulate was better. We then had a discussion about seed and Reg suggested saving different sized shallots for seed; as the smaller ones produce less offspring so will be larger than using large shallots which produce a lot of off spring so they will be smaller. Jim said that he had got good results from shallot seed and Reg suggested that we buy from a reputable grower.

storage by pngshallotspng

3. When do you prune a hebe?

Reg suggested, as the questioner said it was a large hebe, to prune in the spring but to only do half one year and half the next as it might be a shock to the plant to do it all in one year.

4. He was asked about greenhouse and container cleaning.

Reg said unless there was a known disease in a pot or in the greenhouse then use something like Jeyes fluid or Citrox. Otherwise don’t bother, as research has shown that there are more beneficial things in the pots and greenhouse than bad and you don’t want to wash them away.

5. What are the while fluffy things on my houseplants?

Reg said that they may be white fluffy aphids or mealy bugs and said wash off with diluted washing up liquid in water and then use methylated spirit, surgical spirit or vodka! To dry them out.

gall mitepng

He also warned us about the fuchsia gall mite which, so far, hasn’t reached Worcestershire. Remove any infected looking leaves or parts of the plant if you see it.

The spotted wing drosophilia (fruit fly) a yellow bodied insect is now in Worcestershire and its maggot hatches out in cherries. It is very tiny, grey and white in colour. It is difficult to contain as covering a tree in really fine mesh is impracticable. Use drusophilia traps, Agralan Natural Products make them to catch the male insects.

 Fruit Flypng

As usual Reg covers so much in his talks that it is impossible to write about everything and do it justice. Come along and hear him speak next time!

Our next meeting is on Tuesday 21st November when Michael Colquhoun will be talking about ‘Birds of the Malvern Hills’.

 


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